Election 2010: Long Beach Voters Say Yes On Measures B, C And D

7:15am | Voters decided on four local ballot measures yesterday that will affect Long Beach for years to come. Here's how they added up.

Measure GG - No
The Civil Service Department and Human Resources will remain separate after voters refused to pass Measure GG on Tuesday, preferring to keep the current situation with 53.9% disapproval.

The passage of Measure GG would have combined the two departments and eliminated several City positions, including the Executive Director of the Civil Service Department.

The Civil Service Department serves to act as a watchdog over City government hiring practices. The passage of Measure GG would have eliminated the department but not the Civil Service Commission.

Opponents of Measure GG argued that approving the measure would create a "Spoils System" that hired employees based on personal relationships and not qualifications. They also argued that the Civil Service Department existed to prevent hiring lawsuits that would cost taxpayers millions.

A recent independent poll conducted by the Long Beach Post and Probolsky Research showed an initial 30.8% approval rating compared to 42.5% disapproval.

Measure B - Yes, No on 19
Voters in Long Beach approved Measure B to place business license taxes on recreational marijuana businesses operating in the city with 72.3% approval on Tuesday, but the decision is void because California voters did not approve Proposition 19 which would have legalized the sale and possession of recreational marijuana.

A recent independent poll conducted by the Long Beach Post and Probolsky Research showed an initial 67.1% approval rating compared to 24.6% disapproval.

Measure C - Yes
Veterans will receive a better chance to be hired as employees of the City of Long Beach after voters approved Measure C with 68.2% approval on Tuesday. The decision will award more preference to disabled veterans applying for City jobs, and also ease the definition of what a disabled veteran is.

Before, the Civil Service Commission was required to award ten extra points to disabled veterans applying for City positions. Under the passage of Measure C, they will receive fifteen extra points.

The measure also redefines how we determine whether or not a person is a disabled veteran. The previous process defined a veteran as possessing disability at least 30% connected to his or her service. The approved amendment will define a disabled veteran as possessing disability at least 10% connected to his or her service.

A recent independent poll conducted by the Long Beach Post and Probolsky Research showed an initial 65.2% approval rating compared to 19.4% disapproval.

Measure D - Yes
Voters approved the passage of Measure D with 55.4% of the total on Tuesday, effectively changing the way that harbor revenues are transferred from the Harbor Department to the City of Long Beach.

Previously, up to 10% of Port net income could be transferred to the City. Under the passage of Measure D, up to 5% of Port gross operating revenues can be transferred to the City, which is expected to be an increase of at least several million dollars by the most conservative estimates.

Additionally, the handling of all existing and future oil operations within the Harbor District would be handed over to control from the city's Department of Oil Properties.

A recent independent poll conducted by the Long Beach Post and Probolsky Research showed an initial 27.7% approval rating compared to 36.6% disapproval.

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