‘Beach Streets’ will return after two-year hiatus

The popular Beach Streets Open Street event, Beach Streets University, is set to return to East Long Beach for the first time since 2019.

Streets will be closed to cars and any motorized vehicles near Cal State Long Beach on Saturday, Sept. 17, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. to allow the public to walk, bike and socialize safely. Along the route, attendees can enjoy free, family friendly entertainment hubs including a dedicated children’s area at Whaley Park, outdoor music, food and drink specials and activities at the Walter Pyramid.

“We’re so excited for Beach Streets University to be back,” said Mayor Robert Garcia in a release. “This is an amazing event that brings our community together in a safe and family friendly day. I’ll be on my bike all day and can’t wait to see everyone.”

The Beach Streets University route will span from Atherton Street along California State University, Long Beach, up Bellflower Boulevard to Los Coyotes Diagonal, then up Los Coyotes Diagonal to Spring Street, stretching along Spring Street from Bellflower Boulevard to Studebaker Road.

A Beach Streets Open Street event. Courtesy Beach Streets.

Several intersections will be maintained so that motorists can still cross Bellflower Boulevard, Los Coyotes Diagonal and Spring Street—though the entire route and the extended streets will be closed to vehicles, motorcycles, scooters and anything with a motor.

Along the track, attendees can choose to cycle, skate, rollerblade or walk. Motorized vehicles will be allowed for people with disabilities.

The event began in 2015 and became increasingly popular, drawing in tens of thousands of people each year, though it was paused during the pandemic.

According to a release, Beach Streets events “promote the pursuit of innovative strategies to achieve environmental, social, economic and public health goals.”

Those interested in volunteering at this year’s Beach Streets University can register here.

Support our journalism.

Hyperlocal news is an essential force in our democracy, but it costs money to keep an organization like this one alive, and we can’t rely on advertiser support alone. That’s why we’re asking readers like you to support our independent, fact-based journalism. We know you like it—that’s why you’re here. Help us keep hyperlocal news alive in Long Beach.

Laura Anaya-Morga is a general assignment reporter for the Long Beach Post.
- ADVERTISEMENT -

More