Thanksgiving storm’s effects still linger today; storm warnings in force in local mountain areas

 

The state is drenched or blanketed in snow after a powerful Thanksgiving storm.

Rain and snow showers are continuing in parts of the state Friday morning while skies are clearing elsewhere. The storm turned Thanksgiving travel into a nightmare in some places, including the major mountain passes of Southern California.

Heavy snow produced massive gridlock Thursday night on Interstate 15 in Cajon Pass east of Los Angeles. Snow and poor visibility also forced repeated closures of Interstate 15 in Tejon Pass between L.A. and the San Joaquin Valley.

The respite will be short-lived in some parts of the state, including the San Francisco Bay area. Forecasters say an atmospheric river taking aim at the bay region will bring rain and wind by Saturday and continue through Sunday, impacting returning holiday travelers. The Grapevine, which was closed much of Thanksgiving Day, was reopened at 11 p.m. Thursday with the California Highway Patrol running escorts.

Once again, as it has since the storm arrived Wednesday, the National Weather Service warned that “travel could be very difficult to impossible” in the San Gabriels as well as in the Antelope Valley.

The weather service also said the winter storm warning would be in force until 4 p.m. in the Antelope Valley, where 2 to 5 inches of snow are expected on the valley floor and 4 to 8 inches in the foothills, with the snow level between 2,000 and 3,000 feet.

In Orange County, a beach hazard statement, which is slightly less serious than a high surf advisory, will be in effect through this afternoon, with the NWS forecasting surf of 4 to 7 feet and warning that minor coastal flooding is possible during high tide between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.

A 50 percent chance of showers exists today in Los Angeles and the San Gabriel Valley, but the chance of measurable precipitation was only 30 percent in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys.

On Thursday, a Nov. 28 record 2.17 inches of rain were reported at Long Beach Airport, topping the 1.93 set in 1970.

Showers are expected to return on Wednesday.

City News Service and the Associated Press contributed to this story.

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