18 Tables Become Unique Works of Art in Upcoming Exhibition at MADE by Millworks

18x18tables

Image courtesy of MADE by Millworks.

Can a table be more than its utilitarian intentions? Furniture designer Dave Clark certainly thinks so and has challenged 18 local artists with the task of transforming 18 identical, modernistic tables into unique works of art.

Organized by Clark, who designed and built each of the tables, 18 x 18; Interpretations of a Table can be viewed at MADE by Millworks and will run November 1-15 with a public opening reception on Saturday, November 4 from 6:00PM to 9:00PM.

“The idea for this project came from a desire to showcase the diverse creativity of some of Long Beach’s best artistic talent when presented with the same three-dimensional ‘canvas’,” said Clark in a statement. “I’m excited to see how each of the artists that work in different mediums make the table their own unique piece.”

Each table measures 12 inches in length and width and 20 inches in height and was constructed out of medium density fiberboard and steel. Each artist was given a table and encouraged to use additional materials to make it uniquely theirs.

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A photo of the modernistic table was included in the Facebook event. 

The artists tasked with transforming the tables are Katie Stubblefield, Tina Burnight, Renee Tanner, Gregory Dane Sabin, Tracey Weiss, Dave van Patten, Lance Morris, Kashira Edghill, Lisa Wibroe, Cody Lusby, Eric Almanza, Jeff McMillan, Dave Conrey, Eric Vonhunter, Ernesto Torres Ramirez, Roxana Josefina Martinez, Carol Clark and Dave Clark.

The tables will be for sale during a silent auction at the opening reception with a starting bid of $500 for each table.

Learn more about Dave Clark’s work here. Check out a few sneak previews of the tables, and find out more info about the show via the Facebook event page here

MADE by Millworks is located at 240 Pine Avenue.

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Asia Morris has been with the Long Beach Post for five years, specializing in coverage of the arts. Her parents gave her the name because they wanted her to be a world traveler and they got their wish. She has obliged by pursuing art, journalism and a second career as a competitive cyclist.
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