IN PICTURES: 16th Annual Belmont Shore Sidewalk Chalk Art

Walking along Second Street in Belmont Shore on Saturday pedestrians found themselves interacting with artists and their art pieces as artists finished their creations to be submitted for the 16th Annual Belmont Shore Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest.

The showcased art ranged in theme, but all used posterboard, chalk pastels, and the sidewalk as their easel. Creativity and dialogue around art sparked as the artists created their own personal masterpieces along the sidewalks of Second Street. Every year the contest gives artists seven hours to complete their work while sharing their process with passersby.

Jacqueline Ramos draws “Zeno the Husky” along Second Street at the 16th Annual Belmont Shore Sidewalk Art Competition. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Sheri McMlintock from Cypress draws her art titled “Twin Flame Union.” Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Kids play and draw in front of the Chase Bank on Second Street, the epicenter of the Belmont Shore Sidewalk Art Competition. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Lori Escalera interacts with everyone who walks past her art depicting the classic piece “Portrait of a Young Girl.” Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Spectators tilt their heads to decipher David Phon’s portrait of Jackie Chan during his sixth year of participating in the Annual Belmont Shore Sidewalk Chalk Art Competition. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Dog owners and their dogs stop to appreciate a portrait of Angus the dog drawn by Lauryn Logan. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Derick Edwards shares his love of Frida Kahlo’s art as he draws her along Second Street in Belmont Shore. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Leo Aguirre works on his piece called “Starry Monroe” as people stop to admire. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

Penny Richards adds names and stars to her art piece, “Memory Sky,” after each interaction someone shares with her about loss. This is Richards’ 10th year creating interactive art pieces on the sidewalks of Second Street. Photo by Sarahi Apaez.

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Sarahi Apaez is a Long Beach Post contributor who centers her reporting skills on photographs and videos. When she’s not focusing her lens, she’s focusing her balance as she bombs down the boulevards of Long Beach’s streets on her roller skates.
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