These tiny paintings show the beauty of Long Beach’s 2nd District

This week we launched a new project encouraging you to go out and take photos (or paintings in this case) of the areas you frequent, whether it’s your walk to work, bike ride to the grocery store, your turn to take the dog out, a quick stroll on your lunch break or a full-on photo safari; we’d love to feature your shots on The Hi-lo (scroll to the bottom for submission guidelines).

Our very first submission, however, came as a pleasant surprise. Instead of a camera, this observer wields a brush and a pen. An illustrator and graphic designer living in East Long Beach, Monique Dominguez loves taking a sketchbook or her plein air painting kit on walks through the city’s 2nd District so she can paint outdoors.

Website: http://moniquedominguez.com/
Instagram: @moni.domii
Twitter: @moni_domii

Local artist Monique Dominguez paints in Long Beach’s Rose Park neighborhood. Courtesy the artist.

“The largest yard in Carroll Park,” Ink and Copic Marker, 4.5″ x 3.25,” by Monique Dominguez.
I’m always struck by the beauty of this home in Carrol Park. I love its tall trees and large yard. I did this quick sketch to capture the composition with little detail. Courtesy the artist.

“Roobios at Portfolio’s,” Gouache on Illustration Board, 3.25″ x 2.5″ by Monique Dominguez. Something as simple and plain as a reflective white tea mug can give clues about all the different light sources and colors in a coffee shop late at night.  Portfolios’ Tea by Monique Dominguez. Courtesy the artist.

Bixby Park in the Fall, Ink, 4.5″ x 3.25,” by Monique Dominguez. Bixby Park’s stage is, in my opinion, most beautiful when it glows in the afternoon light. I made this quick sketch to study the foliage before I attempted to do a color study. Courtesy the artist.

“Afternoon in Bluff Heights,” Gouache on Illustration Board, 2.25″ x 2″ by Monique Dominguez. I like to paint small so I’m more focused on capturing color than covering my canvas with my paint. It’s important to work fast when the sun is going down because the light changes so quickly. Courtesy the artist.

“Coffee Shop Counter and Villa Rivera,” Ink, (2x) 4.5″ x 3.25,” by Monique Dominguez. I sketched this spread as I made pit stops on my walk back home on a really hot and sunny day. I try to challenge myself to see the beauty in my everyday life. Courtesy the artist.

“Waiting for Laundry on 4th,” Gouache on Coldpress Watercolor Paper, 2.25″ x 4.5″ by Monique Dominguez. Sketching and painting are my forms of meditation. Instead of being on my phone while waiting for my laundry, I decided to unplug and push the colors that I saw on a washing machine that was hit with the midday light. Courtesy the artist.

“Cheers to Your Health, Ink,” 4.5″ x 3.25,” by Monique Dominguez. Sketches don’t need to be perfect or detailed. A sketchbook is meant a visual diary. I jotted down notes about all the things I love about Salud on 4th. Courtesy the artist.

Tiny paintings by Monique Dominguez. Courtesy the artist.

Sketches of Belmont Heights, Ink, 4.5″ x 3.25,” by Monique Dominguez. I love the architecture of the homes in Belmont Heights. One of my favorite past times is walking in this neighborhood and stopping every now and then to quickly sketch an interesting composition, a building’s silhouette or unique architecture. Courtesy the artist.

To submit, email [email protected] 5 to 10 photos with captions, your name and general location, a 100 to 200-word description of your walk/ride/adventure through town and any social media platforms you’d like mentioned.

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Asia Morris has been with the Long Beach Post for five years, specializing in coverage of the arts. Her parents gave her the name because they wanted her to be a world traveler and they got their wish. She has obliged by pursuing art, journalism and a second career as a competitive cyclist.
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