Day of Remembrance for Japanese-Americans Interned During WWII


Instructions for Japanese-Americans during internment phasing. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.
 
8:00am | The Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a motion in which Los Angeles County will recognize today as a Day of Remembrance for Japanese-Americans interned during World War II; the motion was approved this past Tuesday.
 
On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 incarcerating all 120,000 Japanese-Americans and legal residents following Imperial Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. While the order also authorized the selective incarceration of some citizens of German and Italian descent, it forcibly relocated all citizens and legal residents of Japanese ancestry on the West Coast of the United States
 
In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed legislation apologizing for President Roosevelt’s internment on behalf of the U.S. government, stating that the order was based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.”  More than $1.6 billion in reparations was dispersed to those who had been interned.
 
“Los Angeles County, home to one of the largest populations of Japanese-Americans in the nation, has benefited economically and culturally in the fields of business, agriculture, academia, medicine, government and the arts from the many contributions of the Japanese-American community,” said Supervisor Antonovich. 

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Brian Addison has been a writer, editor, and photographer for more than a decade, covering everything from food and culture to transportation and housing. In 2015, he was named Journalist of the Year by the Los Angeles Press Club and has since garnered 16 nominations and two additional wins for Best Political Commentary for his work at KCET and Best Blog for Longbeachize, a section of the Long Beach Post. Brian currently serves as a columnist and editor for the Long Beach Post.
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