Planning Commission to vote on two transit-centric residential buildings in DTLB

The Long Beach Planning Commission will vote on two proposed residential developments: One 120-unit complex at 1101-1157 Long Beach Blvd. and a 97-unit complex at 1112-1130 Locust Ave.

While each of the developments are Downtown and transit-centric, whether or not any of the units will be affordable has yet to be determined.

After revealing dismal (if not outright hideous) renderings of the project, fresh renderings of the transit-oriented housing development show off the Long Beach Boulevard project.

Designed by Architects Orange and developed by one of the groups behind The Current in DTLB, Rockefeller Kempel Architects, the development proposes a seven-story structure set to house 120 units along the west side of Long Beach Boulevard just south of 12th Street. Reminder: This is just a proposal set for the entitlement process through the Planning Commission; if it receives entitlement, it can then be constructed.

Rendering for the residential development at 1101-1157 Long Beach Blvd. Courtesy of Rockefeller Kempel Architects.

Rendering for the residential development at 1101-1157 Long Beach Blvd. Courtesy of Rockefeller Kempel Architects.

Set to demolish a two-story structure along with a handful of one-story structures, the new complex at 1105 Long Beach Blvd. will occupy roughly 108,343 square feet with commercial ground floor space on the first two floors.

While it remains unclear if any of the units will be affordable, the project will include 4,997 square feet of retail and parking for 151 vehicles. According to Rockefeller, there will three different types of units that include studios as well as one- and two-bedroom units.

“Each unit type has its own distinct architectural language,” the Rockefeller description read. “The corner 2-bedroom units are horizontally oriented to reflect the horizontal movement of the nearby Long Beach Blue Line train. The 1-bedroom units are identified by a vertical frame,’ and create vertical movement that excites the public retail courtyard, as well as the 12th Street façade. Studio units are identified by large blocks of light and dark material, which create a strong graphic pattern and level of visual interest.”

Housing development by Plus Architects at 1112-1130 Locust Avenue. Courtesy of Plus Architects.

Housing development by Plus Architects at 1112-1130 Locust Avenue. Courtesy of Plus Architects.

The Locust Avenue project, much less ambitious and will host a design that is becoming exhaustingly ubiquitous throughout Long Beach. It  will take over a half-acre parking lot and include 97 units, 122 car parking stalls, and 20 bicycle stalls.

Banal and uninspired—even jacking the same color scheme and design elements as the Linden and Fourth Street development currently underway—the seven-story, podium-type building was designed by Los Angeles-based firm Plus Architects. Units will have studio, one- and two-bedroom options.

Housing development by Plus Architects at 1112-1130 Locust Avenue. Courtesy of Plus Architects.

Housing development by Plus Architects at 1112-1130 Locust Avenue. Courtesy of Plus Architects.

While the renderings for the Long Beach Boulevard project is a bit more ambitious, both developments join the countless … other … developments … that … lack … both boldness and interest—along with affordability.

But: Housing is a good thing in this climate whether it’s pretty or not. The key issues now are just a few small things—mainly focusing on affordability, limiting displacement, creating an inclusionary ordinance, decreasing segregation, protecting marginalized populations, and increasing accessibility. No big deal, everyone.

Brian Addison is a columnist and editor for the Long Beach Post. Reach him at [email protected] or on social media at FacebookTwitterInstagram, and LinkedIn.

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Brian Addison has been a writer, editor and photographer for more than a decade, covering everything from food to politics to urban transportation and housing. In 2015, he was named Journalist of the Year by the Los Angeles Press Club and has since garnered 12 nominations and an additional win for Best Political Commentary. Born in Big Bear, he has lived in Long Beach since college. Brian currently serves as a columnist and editor for the Long Beach Post.
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