LBCC’s ASB, Student Trustee Express Distrust of Four Trustees; Call for Recall Served

Citing a loss of credibility and leadership at this week’s board meeting, Long Beach City College (LBCC) Student Trustee Jason Troia boldly called for the recall of the four trustees who voted earlier this year to discontinue 11 programs.

Following a vote of no confidence towards the Board of Trustees by the LBCC Associated Student Body this past monday, Troia echoed those sentiments with direct recall servings for President Roberto Uranga, Vice President Jeffrey Kellogg, Douglas Otto and Thomas Clark; boardmember Mark Bowen was exempt as he was the lone vote against the discontinuance of the programs.

Troia, who accused the trustees of a list of wrong-doings–betraying the trust of voters and taxpayers; violating the Brown Act as well as Title V of the California Code of Regulations; ignoring the mission of LBCC–is no stranger to criticizing the Board.

Before the Board formally discontinued the programs, Troia expressed last December a dismal prospect within the Board’s reasoning: “At best, the ramifications of these cuts will linger for decades if these programs are ever reconsidered in this community again… There is a failure of imagination with the collective brainpower we have within this institution.”

Boardmembers were sharp in returning criticism, with President Uranga claiming Troia’s “mouthful” was ultimately “disappointing.”

“While it is easy to understand why students dislike this decision of this Board,” Urgana said, “ample opportunity was provided for students and other college stakeholders to inform the process.”

Trustee Kellogg–noting that LBCC is “not a business”–reinforced the idea that a bad decision had to be made and the moment to move forward was given and taken.

In order to complete the recall, Troia and his supporters would have to gather thousands of signatures from each trustee’s district–four of the five–which could amount to a lengthy and costly process.

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