Long Beach will require proof of vaccination at bars, aligning with LA County

Long Beach officials said in a statement late Wednesday that they will align with Los Angeles County in now requiring proof of vaccination at indoor bars, wineries, breweries and distilleries that do not serve food.

The new ordinance will not affect restaurants, but the city “strongly recommends” they require vaccination, too.

Proof that an individual has received a first dose of vaccine will be required by Oct. 7, and a second dose by Nov. 4. The new order will be issued Friday, officials said.

Drinking establishments are most often populated by people in their 20s and 30s, who are least likely to be vaccinated, the city said.

“Data show that those who are 18-34 years old are least likely to be vaccinated and are being infected at higher rates than other age groups,” the city Health Department said in a statement. “Indoor bars, breweries, wineries and distilleries are considered some of the most high-risk settings and have the highest instances of interaction without masks.”

Roughly 61% of those 18-34 are vaccinated, city data shows, compared to 99% of those over 65.

Similar to LA County, the city will also require organizers of “mega” outdoors events where more than 10,000 people are in attendance to require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours.

The city had already required this of its largest event, the Acura Grand Prix of Long Beach taking place Sept. 24-26.

It’s not clear what other large events in Long Beach this would impact, but in Los Angeles County it will affect professional sporting events and popular theme parks like Universal Studios Hollywood and Six Flags Magic Mountain.

LA County to mandate vaccine or negative COVID-19 test for large outdoor events

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Melissa has been a journalist for over two decades, starting her career as a reporter covering health and religion and moving into local news. She has worked as an editor for eight years, including seven years at the Press Telegram before joining the Long Beach Post in June 2018. She also serves as a part-time lecturer at Cal State Long Beach where she teaches multimedia journalism and writing.
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