What you can and can’t do under the stay at home order

Editor’s note: City officials have added to the order since this was published, you can find the changes here

You can still go on walks. You can still go to the grocery store. You can still pick up food from restaurants (to-go orders only).

Los Angeles County and state officials on Thursday issued a stay at home order to help slow the spread of coronavirus. The order goes into effect at midnight and is punishable by fines or imprisonment.

Under Long Beach’s new “safer at home” order—and the governor’s order given minutes later—gatherings of 10 or more people are banned.

For gatherings that aren’t prohibited, people must be separated by at least 6 feet, have a hand washing station or hand sanitizer available and post a sign notifying people not to come if they have a fever or cough.

Malls, shopping centers, playgrounds and nonessential retail businesses are ordered closed. Gyms, movie theaters, bars and wineries were ordered closed on Sunday. People can still exercise outside and go on walks or hikes, but all sports facilities have been closed at local parks and beaches to help enforce social distancing.

Residents can expect everything but “essential businesses” to be closed.

Essential businesses include:
  • Grocery stores, certified farmers’ markets, food banks, convenience stores, pet supply stores, farm and produce stands. This includes stores that sell groceries and sell other non-grocery products, and products necessary to maintaining the safety and sanitation of homes.
  • Restaurants and beverage facilities that prepare and serve food or beverages, but only for delivery, drive-through or carry out.
  • Cannabis dispensaries with a medicinal cannabis license.
  • Newspapers, television, radio, magazine, podcast and other media services.
  • Gas stations, and auto-supply, auto-repair and car dealerships.
  • Banks and credit unions.
  • Hardware stores, garden nurseries, building supplies.
  • Childcare facilities providing services that enable employees exempted to work. To the extent possible, childcare facilities must operate under the following mandatory conditions: (1) Childcare must be carried out in stable groups of 12 or fewer; (2) Children shall not change from one group to another; (3) If more than one group of children is cared for at one facility, each group shall be in a separate room. Groups shall not mix with each other; (4) Childcare providers shall remain solely with one group of children.
  • Hotels, motels, shared rental units and similar facilities.
  • Food cultivation, including farming, livestock and fishing.
  • Homeless shelters and social services for economically disadvantaged people.
  • Plumbers, electricians, exterminators, custodial/janitorial workers, handyman services, funeral home workers and morticians, moving services, HVAC installers, carpenters, landscapers, gardeners, property managers, private security personnel and other service providers who provide services to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation to properties and other essential businesses.
  • Mailing and shipping businesses, including post office boxes.
  • Educational institutions (including public and private K-12 schools, colleges, and universities) for purposes of facilitating distance learning or performing essential functions, provided that social distancing of 6-feet per person is maintained to the greatest extent possible.
  • Laundromats, dry cleaners and laundry service providers.
  • Businesses that supply office or computer products needed by people who work from home.
  • Businesses that supply other Essential Businesses with the support or supplies necessary to operate.
  • Businesses that ship, truck, provide logistical support or deliver groceries, food, goods or services directly to residences, essential businesses, healthcare operations, essential infrastructure.
  • Airlines, taxis and other private transportation providers providing transportation services necessary for activities of daily living.
  • Businesses that provide parts and service for essential infrastructure.
  • Home-based care for seniors, adults, people with a disability, or children.
  • Residential facilities and shelters for seniors, adults, people with a disability, and children.
  • Professional services, such as legal or accounting services, when necessary to assist in compliance with legally mandated activities.
  • Military/defense contractors/FFRDC (Federally Funded Research and Development Centers). Essential personnel may leave their residence to provide any service or perform any work deemed essential for national security including, but not limited to defense, intelligence and aerospace development and manufacturing for the Department of Defense, the intelligence community, and NASA and other federal government, and or United States Government departments and agencies. Essential personnel include prime, sub-primes, and supplier contractor employees, at both the prime contract level and any supplier levels at any tier, working on federal United States Government contracts such as contracts rated under the Defense Priorities and Allocations System (DPAS) and contracts for national intelligence and national security requirements.

Editor’s note: This article has been updated to remove “personal grooming services” from the list of essential businesses. Officials later clarified that they are not considered essential. 

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Valerie Osier is a breaking news and crime reporter for the Long Beach Post. She’s a Riverside native who found her love for journalism while at community college. She graduated from the Cal State Long Beach journalism program in 2017 and covered the Palos Verdes Peninsula for the Daily Breeze prior to coming to the Post. She lives in Long Beach with her husband and two cats.
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