VIDEO: Phil the bloomed corpse lily greets fans at CSULB

He bloomed, he smelled and he conquered the hearts of many.

Phil the corpse lily finally bloomed in his nursery at Cal State Long Beach after 10 years of cultivation.

This is the second rare experience in recent years for the campus, according to school officials. His counterpart, Larua, surprised the unviersity with a bloom at the age of 7 in 2015.

Standing at well over 7 feet from the soil line in the pot to the tip of his spadix, Phil is named after the late Dr. Philip Baker, professor emeritus of plant systematics in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics’ botany program.

The college’s Department of Biolgoical Scicences acquired the seedling in 2009.

“The species name of the flowering plant is Amorphophallus titanum and it is native to Sumatra,” school officials said in a release. “Its blossoming illustrates the results of millions of years of gradual, specific evolution to achieve reproductive success.”

The stench associated with the rare ‘corpse flower’ takes seven to 15 years to blossom and only stays open between 24 to 48 hours, school officials said.

“I hope that witnessing and learning about the corpse flower will help others to appreciate the importance of understanding the complex relationships that develop in every ecosystem–and support research efforts and the preservation of lives beyond our own species,” says Brian Thorson, botanical curator and botany technician for the campus.

Phil will be on display outside the Hall of Science from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. until it expires.

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach. Long Beach California, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach. Long Beach California, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

Luan Tinoco holds her nose as she gets a close up look at ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that recently bloomed this weekend, at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathered to see and smell ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

Waiyee Fong of Cerritos Calif., poses for a photo next to a ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that bloomed this weekend, at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

CSULB Alumi Zach Eggar and Hailey Sarne pose for a photo next to a ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that bloomed this weekend, at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

A large crowd gathers to see ” Phil ” the corpse flower, that just bloomed this weekend at Cal State Long Beach, Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Photo by Stephen Carr

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Stephanie Rivera is the immigration and diversity reporter for the Long Beach Post. Growing up as one of six kids in the working-class immigrant suburb of South Gate, she was taught the importance of civic engagement and to show compassion for others. After graduating from CSULB with a degree in journalism, Stephanie worked for Patch Latino and City News Service before coming to the Long Beach Post in 2015. An avid Harry Potter fan, Stephanie now lives in Bixby Knolls with her boyfriend and their bearded dragon, Austin.
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